HR and CSR issues

Changes on the board of management of Robert Bosch GmbH

  • Effective March 31, 2015, Wolf-Henning Scheider will be leaving the company. As from July 1, 2015, he will become chairman of the board of management of MAHLE GmbH.
  • Dr. Rolf Bulander will head up the Bosch business sector Mobility Solutions from April 1, 2015. As before, he will be responsible for the Diesel Systems, Gasoline Systems, and Starter Motors and Generators divisions, and will also have corporate responsibility for quality. In addition, he will be assuming responsibility for the Electrical Drives division.
  • Effective April 1, 2015, Dr. Markus Heyn will be appointed to the board of management. There, he will assume responsibility for Automotive Original Equipment Sales, Marketing and Sales, the Automotive Aftermarket division, and the subsidiaries ETAS GmbH and Bosch Engineering GmbH.
  • As before, Dr. Dirk Hoheisel will be responsible for the Chassis Systems Control, Car Multimedia, and Automotive Electronics divisions, as well as for Automotive Systems Integration. Effective April 1, 2015, he will also assume responsibility for the Automotive Steering division.
Stuttgart – Wolf-Henning Scheider (52) is leaving the Bosch Group effective March 31, 2015, and joining MAHLE GmbH. Effective July 1, 2015, he will become chairman of its board of management. For some years, Bosch and MAHLE have enjoyed a close business relationship. Since 2008, they have run the Bosch Mahle Turbosystems joint venture, which develops and manufactures exhaust-gas turbochargers. Scheider is spokesperson for the Automotive Group and has been a member of the Bosch board of management since 2010.

The shareholders and supervisory board thank Scheider for his many years of good service in various functions with Robert Bosch GmbH. Over the course of his career, Scheider was president of the Car Multimedia division, as well as president of the Gasoline Systems division from 2006 to 2010.

Effective April 1, 2015, Dr. Rolf Bulander (56) will assume responsibility for the Mobility Solutions business sector. Operationally, he will be responsible for the Diesel Systems, Gasoline Systems, and Starter Motors and Generators divisions, and will also have corporate responsibility for quality. In addition, he will be responsible for the Electrical Drives division in the future. Bulander, who has a PhD in mechanical engineering, has been with the company for 26 years and was appointed to the board of management in 2013. Prior to that, he was president of the Gasoline Systems division.

At the same time, Dr. Markus Heyn (50) will be joining the board of management of Robert Bosch GmbH. Following a proposal by the shareholders, this was decided by the supervisory board. His future areas of responsibility will include Automotive Original Equipment Sales and Marketing and Sales. He will also be responsible for the Automotive Aftermarket division and the ETAS GmbH and Bosch Engineering GmbH subsidiaries. Heyn, who also has a PhD in mechanical engineering, has been with Bosch since 1999. Most recently, he was president of the Diesel Systems division.

As part of the reshuffle of responsibilities, Dr. Dirk Hoheisel (56) will retain responsibility for the Chassis Systems Control, Car Multimedia, and Automotive Electronics divisions. He will also assume responsibility for the new Automotive Steering division. The latter change is subject to the antitrust authorities approving the complete acquisition of ZF Lenksysteme GmbH. In addition, Hoheisel will remain responsible for Automotive Systems Integration. Hoheisel, who has a PhD in electrical engineering, has been a member of the board of management since 2012. He was previously a member of the executive management of the Car Multimedia and Chassis Systems Control divisions.

The shareholders and supervisory board wish Dr. Rolf Bulander, Dr. Markus Heyn, and Dr. Dirk Hoheisel every success in their new functions.

Links to the resumés and photos of the board of management members:
Dr. Rolf Bulander
Dr. Markus Heyn
Dr. Dirk Hoheisel
Wolf-Henning Scheider
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  • December 16, 2014
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The company suggestions scheme turns 90 Bosch: Associates' ideas save 395 million euros From a “suggestions book” to global ideas management

  • Company founder Robert Bosch introduced the suggestions book in 1924
  • Two associates at Bosch foundry have received the highest possible cash reward of 150,000 euros
  • Christoph Kübel, Bosch director of industrial relations: “Associates' ideas enhance our innovative strength”
Stuttgart – For 90 years now, Bosch has systematically benefited from its associates' creativity and innovative spirit. In the past ten years in Germany alone, the company has saved some 395 million euros thanks to suggestions for improvement made by its associates. Last year, the global supplier of technology and services paid out 7.7 million euros to associates at locations across Germany in reward for their ideas, which had saved Bosch some 33 million euros. In total, a good 21,900 associates submitted their suggestions, an increase of 2.4 percent over the previous year. In the fall of 1924, Robert Bosch announced the launch of a company suggestions book. In so doing, he laid the foundation stone for what has since become a global ideas management program. His aim was to “perfect work processes and improve products, or reduce the cost of producing and managing them.” Bosch recently received the 2014 DeutschenIdeenPreis (German idea prize) for the best ideas management program in the automotive supplier category.

“The creativity of our associates continues to fuel our innovative strength,” said Christoph Kübel, member of the board of management and director of industrial relations at Robert Bosch GmbH, on the occasion of the anniversary. “The experience, creativity, and proactive thinking of each associate makes us more competitive and leads to better products. Often, small ideas that are beyond the scope of everyday tasks can make a big difference,” Kübel said. According to Kübel, such ideas are also the product of a working culture that values cultural diversity and promotes creativity.

Ideas management: more than making suggestions
At Bosch, associates at every location are encouraged to submit suggestions for improvement. Ideas can include, for instance, ways of optimizing operations, improving product quality, avoiding waste, or promoting environmental protection. Associates are also encouraged to submit ideas that may even go beyond their direct areas of responsibility. If an improvement is implemented and results in cost savings, the associates concerned are given a cash reward of up to 150,000 euros. In addition to this company suggestion scheme, Bosch also relies on systematic ideas generation. “We don't just submit suggestions, but also generate ideas,” said Peter Schmid, who is charge of the Bosch Group's ideas management program. “For example, coordinators attend workshops to learn how they can use creativity techniques to actively support associates at their locations. Knowledge platforms, advisory services, networks, workshops, and further training can contribute to continuous improvement.” Associates can even train to become “Bosch Innovation Agents.”

Clever ideas – making clogged pipes a thing of the past
Two associates at the Bosch site in Lohr, Germany, received the highest possible cash prize of 150,000 euros. Ferdinand Schneider and Xhafer Istrefi, who work at a foundry of the Bosch Drive and Control Technology division, came up with an inexpensive way to clean pipes through which molten steel flows: they use oxygen. “In the past, clogged pipes resulted in frequent down-time, and there were often delays before the next processing steps could take place,” Schneider says. The two associates went ahead and improved the process, without thinking of a potential cash reward. “We didn't submit our idea as a suggestion for improvement until we noticed while testing it out that production numbers had improved,” Istrefi says.

U.S. plant in Charleston: leading the field in ideas management
The suggestions scheme that the company founder Robert Bosch introduced in Germany is now part of a comprehensive ideas management program. Designing and implementing customized idea generation shapes the basis of innovation. Today, Bosch ideas management is successful around the world. The program comprises a network of more than 60 coordinators, who support Bosch locations in systematically coming up with ideas for improvements. This is in addition to the ideas that associates come up with by chance. The Charleston location in the United States has been especially successful of late. HR boss Kübel described the plant as having by far the best ideas management. In Germany, the Ansbach plant leads the field.

Suggestions for improvement 2.0 – standardized ideas management around the world
In the future, ideas management around the world will be even simpler. Many associates can already submit ideas electronically, and now the different IT systems used at Bosch locations in Germany and beyond are set to be standardized. At the Jaipur site in India, for instance, an online system has already been introduced. At easily accessible terminals, each associate can see whether or not their supervisor has already looked at their idea, and whether it has already been put into practice. At Bosch, today's ideas management program reflects the words of Robert Bosch, which continue to inspire associates around the world: “We should all strive to improve on the status quo: none of us should ever be satisfied with what they have achieved, but should always endeavor to get better.”

Internet:
Bosch as an employer: www.bosch-career.de
Diversity at Bosch: http://bit.ly/1485Zrk
DeutscherIdeenPreis: http://bit.ly/1FV1Gjf

Audio:
Robert Bosch (in German): “Always strive to improve”: http://bit.ly/1sj5Lo8
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  • November 24, 2014
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Dual education system in Asia German Minister visits new Bosch training center in Vietnam

  • Proven Bosch occupational training model paves the way for professional competence development
  • Some 50 Bosch trainees in Vietnam since the center opened one year ago
  • Demand for qualified skilled workers rising in Asian growth markets
Ho Chi Minh City/Stuttgart – Sigmar Gabriel, Germany's Federal Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy, visited Bosch's training center in Vietnam today. Last year, the company became the first to introduce occupational training based on the tried-and-tested German “dual system” in Vietnam. Since then, some 50 young Vietnamese men and women have taken the first step toward their future careers by training to become industrial mechanics at Bosch. The occupational training model combines theoretical instruction at a vocational school with practical training at the company.

“The strong economic relations between Vietnam and Germany are boosting demand for an increasingly well-trained Vietnamese workforce,” Gabriel said during his visit to Bosch as part of his trip to this year's Asia Pacific Conference of German Business in Vietnam. “Initiatives such as Bosch's cooperation with a local vocational school are breaking new ground in vocational training in Vietnam.” Vietnam's prime minister Nguyen Tan Dung has also expressly encouraged Bosch to promote the system's further development in the country.

High demand for Bosch occupational training model in Asia
At Bosch, vocational training can look back on a long tradition. Robert Bosch set up the first occupational training department at his company in 1913. Today, the supplier of technology and services is training some 6,900 apprentices in a total of 20 countries. Nearly 2,000 of those apprentices are based outside Germany.

In Asia especially, the need for qualified skilled workers is growing at an increasingly rapid pace. “For Bosch, Asia Pacific is an important growth region. We see professional competence development both as a part of our localization strategy and as essential for our growing business in this dynamic region,” said Peter Tyroller, the Bosch board of management member responsible for Asia Pacific. Over the past ten years, Bosch has more than doubled its sales in Asia Pacific to 11.1 billion euros. The company aims to double its sales in the region again by 2020. In addition to large countries such as China and India, the growth markets of Southeast Asia are set to make an increasing contribution to this development.

Along with the center in Vietnam, six other Bosch locations in Asia offer training according to the German model. In Thailand, the “dual system” was introduced in 2013. In China, Bosch opened the first of four training centers in 2007. The center of excellence for vocational training in India has been in existence since 1961 and has repeatedly been named the best in the country. In light of the increasing competition for the best people, Bosch plans to continue opening additional training centers around the world in the future.

Bosch in Vietnam
Bosch has been present in Vietnam since 1994 and opened its first branch office in Ho Chi Minh City in 2008. Since July 2014, Bosch's headquarters in Vietnam have been located in Dang Nai province. The Bosch plant in Dong Nai produces pushbelts for continuously variable transmissions. In 2010, Bosch set up its first software engineering center in southeast Asia. Located in Ho Chi Minh City, the center employs around 650 associates. In July 2014, Bosch opened an additional development center for automotive technology there. Altogether, Bosch currently employs some 2,000 associates in Vietnam.
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  • November 20, 2014
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Chancellor Merkel convenes specialist conference Bosch Chief Personnel Officer Kübel: “Germany needs more women bosses” Mixed leadership teams boost competitiveness

  • Second “women in leadership positions” conference in Federal Chancellery
  • Flexible worktime arrangements and respect for family commitments conducive to women's careers
  • Integrated approach instead of individual actions
Stuttgart – “If more women in Germany are to opt for a leadership career, we need an integrated approach involving business, politics, and society.” This was the appeal made by Christoph Kübel, member of the board of management and director of industrial relations of Robert Bosch GmbH, at a specialist conference attended by Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin. “Mixed leadership teams can help Germany remain a leading economy.” Speaking at the Federal Chancellery to leading representatives of politics, academia, and business, Kübel stressed that corporate and working culture play a vital role in this context. “Germany needs more women bosses. Flexible working models, respect for family commitments, and the elimination of prejudice can all play an important role in attracting more women leadership candidates.” In his view, women play a crucial role in a company's success, yet they far too rarely manage to get a foot on the executive career ladder. Given the foreseeable lack of qualified personnel, businesses that fail to exploit this potential are shooting themselves in the foot, Kübel added.

Diversity management: casting off traditional roles and mindsets
“In everyday practice, women on a leadership career path often have to deal with adversity,” Kübel says. “Frequently, they find themselves confronted with obsolete role models and mindsets.” For this reason, Kübel is convinced that real change is needed on every level, not least to overthrow hackneyed stereotypes based on gender. Worldwide, therefore, Bosch carries out diversity management, encouraging respect for heterogeneity and non-standard career paths. By 2020, the supplier of technology and services wants to increase the share of women in leadership positions to 20 percent worldwide. Bosch as a whole has already reached a 12 percent share, with certain countries already having exceeding the target, such as China (23 percent) and Spain (21 percent). To give women permanent support on their career paths, Bosch offers special mentoring programs, networks, seminars, and training courses.

Girls' Campus: kindling young women's interest in technology
Kübel said that Bosch wants to make a contribution to society, and give it the benefit of its experience: “For us, there is no doubt that mixed leadership teams are more successful, and can thus make Germany as a whole more competitive.” This is why Bosch supports initiatives to kindle children's interest in technology at an early age. Chancellor Merkel was especially interested to hear about the “Girls' Campus” program: this project, organized jointly by Robert Bosch GmbH and Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH, offers female high-school students a year-long program of weekend seminars, at which they gain insights into the world of work, are shown around companies, receive tuition in technical subjects, and learn presentation techniques. The aim is to kindle young women's enthusiasm for science and technology. Apart from Girls' Campus and Girls' Day, Bosch also takes part in more than 250 education alliances across the German school system as part of the “Wissensfabrik” (knowledge factory) initiative.

Internet:
Bosch as an employer: http://bit.ly/1kuDdrM
Diversity at Bosch: http://bit.ly/1q8kzGS
Balancing work and private life at Bosch: http://bit.ly/1vQqaDN
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  • October 15, 2014
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