Mobility Solutions

Add to my press materials
  • April 27, 2016
  • Press kit
  • Mobility Solutions
  • Images: 30
  • Videos: 5

Show car provides a glimpse into the automotive future Bosch is turning connected cars into personal assistants

  • Automated driving opens up new interaction and communication possibilities for drivers
  • Interface concept takes an integrated approach; large-surface monitors offer flexible display options that can be adapted to any situation
  • Connecting car and home enhances safety and convenience
Always online, connected with their surroundings, driving themselves: over the next decade, cars and car driving will make huge strides forward. New functions also have repercussions for the design of car interiors. The latest Bosch show car shows how car and driver will soon be able to communicate with each other – and the possibilities that will arise from this. Bosch CEO Dr. Volkmar Denner firmly believes that the “car of the future will be a new digital living environment.” After all, highly automated driving on the freeway will do more than significantly improve safety and fuel-efficiency. From the cars of the future, drivers will also be able to communicate – including by video conference – with others, such as friends, family, or coworkers. “Alongside the home and the office, the car will become the third living environment and a personal assistant,” Denner says.

New display and user interfaces
The show car’s human-machine interface follows an integrated approach. It provides the driver with one single interface that supplies information in the interactive form best suited to the given situation. In practical terms, this means that Bosch has replaced the usual front and middle consoles with large-surface monitors. These can display any information flexibly, as required by the given situation. All-round interior lighting completes the display concept. Its color is selected based on the driver’s preference, but the lighting can also warn of potential hazards: if a pedestrian or cyclist is about to cross in front of the vehicle, the interior lighting blinks rapidly to direct the driver’s attention to the left or right side as necessary. This ambient light function is therefore another of the vehicle’s extensive range of safety features, which also include lane-keeping support and emergency brake and traffic jam assists.

Automated driving opens up new possibilities
In the Bosch show car, the driver has access to real-time traffic and weather information, both from the cloud and in social media and communication applications. To ensure that drivers do not endanger others when using these functions, they can be used only during automated driving. Bosch engineers paid special attention to the safe and seamless transfer of this responsibility from the driver to the car and back. In a first step, drivers are informed when highly automated driving is possible. If they want the car to take control, they simply place their thumbs on specific contact points on the left and right sides of the steering wheel for three seconds. If drivers wish to regain control of the vehicle or are about to exit the freeway, they use the same procedure.

It is in automated driving that the strengths of the flexible display concept really come into their own. Images from a video conference, e-mails, or media player then take precedence; a simple swipe is all it takes for drivers to shift back and forth seamlessly between the different displays. Adaptive algorithms adjust the content to the situation and drivers’ habits. Preferences such as seat and mirror positions or preset radio stations can of course be saved as well. Fingerprint identification allows the driver to start the car. At the same time, personal settings are retrieved from the memory.

Connected with the entire world – and with home
Over the internet of things, the vehicle can also connect with other domains, such as the driver’s home. If a visitor rings the doorbell, the car switches on the intercom. A fingerprint sensor in the car allows the driver to open the front door remotely. In this way, a package delivery person can be admitted into a sealed-off foyer, for example. The driver can also confirm receipt of the package by fingerprint. Once again, this cannot happen without automated driving.

Once the vehicle arrives at home, it reconnects with the home security system, allowing the driver to first retrieve images from the home’s exterior cameras before driving onto the property. It is also possible to view the vehicle’s direct surroundings using the on-board cameras. This prevents trespassers hiding behind the car from gaining access to the property. Such features are particularly attractive in countries where security is at a premium. Once the passengers have all exited the car, it then parks itself in the garage – ready for the next drive.

Created in cooperation with the prototype developer EDAG, the show car features an outer skin consisting of lightweight 3D-printed modules.

Contact for press inquiries: Stephan Kraus, phone: +49 711 811-6286
More
Add to my press materials
  • April 27, 2016
  • Press releases
  • Mobility Solutions
  • Images: 3

Motorcycle technology business is booming Bosch aims to achieve sales of one billion euros in motorcycle market Driven by solutions for more efficiency and safety

  • Bosch board of management member Hoheisel: “In 2020, we want to achieve sales of one billion euros in motorcycle technology.”
  • Two-Wheeler and Powersports unit has tripled its workforce in under a year.
  • Bosch side view assist is the first assistance system for motorcycles.
  • More than 160 million motorized two-wheelers will be built worldwide in 2021.
  • Since 1995, Bosch has manufactured more than two million motorcycle ABS units.
Yokohama, Japan and Stuttgart, Germany – The Bosch Two-Wheeler and Powersports unit continues to gain momentum in the global motorcycle market. Since the business unit was founded in Japan in April 2015, sales of motorcycle technology have risen by more than 20 percent. By comparison, production volumes for motorized two-wheelers have grown by less than 5 percent over the same period. This success is built on a broad product portfolio: The Two-Wheeler and Powersports unit is the leading supplier of motorcycle safety technology; its side view assist is the world’s first assistance system for motorcycles. In addition, the business unit supplies efficient injection technology as well as smart connectivity solutions and modern display instruments. Around the world, the unit’s 130 associates – three times as many as a year ago – can draw on a worldwide network of several thousand engineers, as well as on the manufacturing capacity of the Mobility Solutions business sector. The unit is well positioned for the future. “In 2020, we want to achieve sales of one billion euros in motorcycle technology,” says the Bosch management board member Dr. Dirk Hoheisel. In the future, Bosch will generate more than half these sales in Asia.

Almost 90 percent of all motorcycles are produced in Asia
Studies indicate that by 2021, the annual global production of two-wheelers should surpass 160 million – roughly one-third more than today. Almost 90 percent of these will be built in China, India, and southeast Asia. They will predominantly be mopeds with up to 250 cc displacement – the most common form of transport across much of Asia. “In emerging markets, motorized two-wheelers are often the least expensive way to get around,” Hoheisel says. At the same time, these vehicles also face the challenge posed by stricter emissions legislation. In Asia, many two-wheelers with internal-combustion engines are still equipped with outdated carburetor technology. In contrast, Bosch offers its electronically controlled fuel-injection system, which can reduce fuel consumption by up to 16 percent depending on the situation. This is Bosch’s contribution to reducing emissions in countries such as India.

Desire for efficiency and safety as a boost for business
Along with a requirement for more efficiency, demand for increased motorcycle safety is growing in emerging markets. In Thailand and Indonesia, for example, some 21,000 people die in motorcycle accidents each year. ABS can prevent one-quarter of all motorcycle accidents that result in casualties. The antilock braking system stops the wheels from locking up, which means the rider remains in control of the motorcycle while braking. This enables riders to react more quickly and without fear in a dangerous situation. Worldwide, more and more countries are promoting motorcycle ABS. Throughout the EU, all newly sold motorized two-wheelers with more than 125 cc displacement must be fitted with an antilock braking system as of 2017. Starting in October 2018, Japan will be mandating ABS for new type approvals for motorcycles with more than 125 cc. Brazil and Taiwan, too, have already passed laws mandating ABS in the future. The issue is also on the political agenda in India and the United States.

A product for each market: from ABS to side view assist
Since 1995, Bosch has manufactured more than two million motorcycle ABS units. This year the company is releasing ABS 10, a variant that is designed specifically to meet the requirements of emerging markets. With its compact dimensions and weighing just 450 grams, this system is easier for manufacturers to integrate into mopeds for price-sensitive customers. “Safety cannot be a question of cost. We are bringing our ABS technology to all classes and markets,” Hoheisel says. For high-performance motorbikes, demand for which is strongest in Europe, Japan, and North America, Bosch developed MSC motorcycle stability control – a kind of ESP for motorcycles – in 2013. By monitoring two-wheeler parameters such as lean angle, the system can instantaneously adjust its electronic braking and acceleration interventions to suit the riding status. This prevents the bike from lowsiding or righting itself when braking in bends. But development doesn’t stop there: with side view assist, Bosch has launched the world’s first assistance system for motorized two-wheelers. When changing lanes, the assistant uses ultrasonic sensors to check for danger in the areas on either side of the bike – areas which are hard for the rider to see.

Connected motorcycles are even safer
The future of the motorcycle is not only safe and clean but also connected. Bosch has two motorcycle connectivity solutions in its portfolio. First, the ICC integrated connectivity cluster is a rider information system that connects motorcycles and smartphones and can be used to operate apps. Second, Bosch uses its CCU connectivity control unit to connect motorcycles with the cloud. This makes it possible to implement functions such as eCall, the automatic emergency call service. If the motorcycle is involved in an accident, eCall automatically places an emergency call, ensuring help arrives more quickly. eCall is not yet mandatory for motorcycles in the EU, but from April 2018 it will be mandatory for all new type approvals for cars and light trucks up to 3.5 metric tons. The CCU can also provide riders with useful information on issues such as potential danger spots on the roads and can help track down a stolen motorbike.

Related link: www.bosch-motorcycle.com

Contact for press inquiries: Jörn Ebberg, phone: +49 711 811-26223
More
Add to my press materials
  • April 13, 2016
  • Press releases
  • Mobility Solutions
  • Images: 6

Driver’s cab of the future Bosch at bauma 2016: bringing intelligence to tomorrow’s construction machinery

  • Megatrends: automation, electrification, connectivity
  • Driver’s cab of the future: all data on the central tablet display at the swipe of a finger
  • Bosch as a systems supplier: integrated solutions for every commercial vehicle
Time is money! Nowhere is this truer than on construction sites. Maneuvering around the site, unexpected delays caused by excavator and wheel-loader accidents or breakdowns – all this costs time and hence also money. “We take a machine that weighs several tons and maneuver it with millimeter accuracy, eight hours a day. Even the tiniest detail has to be right,” says the wheel-loader operator Roland Ehrensberger. That is why, at this year’s bauma trade show, Bosch is presenting a driver’s cab developed especially for construction machinery. At this driver workplace of the future, vehicle operating data can be analyzed to the nearest second on a tablet display. And that is not all: ultrasonic and video sensors monitor the vehicle’s surroundings more thoroughly than any rear-view mirror, which prevents downtimes due to accidents. These surround sensors are an important step in the process of giving construction vehicles more intelligence, and so making them even safer. “Bosch is turning construction machinery into technology showpieces,” says Johannes-Jörg Rüger, president of Bosch’s newly founded Commercial Vehicle & Off-Road unit. “The megatrends of automation, electrification, and connectivity don’t stop at the gates of construction sites or mines.” In the future, construction machinery will automatically carry out certain tasks, with drivers scheduling tasks at the connected interface in their cab.

Bosch is presenting systems solutions for construction machinery for the first time at bauma 2016. At the start of the year, the supplier of technology and services set up a unit specifically for this field. “As a systems supplier, we want to offer everyone the solution they need,” Rüger says. The unit’s portfolio comprises all the Bosch products and services that are relevant for construction machinery: “Modern sensor systems, cameras, and display technology improve the driver’s workplace, as well as increasing safety and hence also productivity,” explains Andrew Allen, head of the unit’s Construction business.

Bosch also participating in joint Genius CAB project
Bosch has worked with partners to integrate its products into a futuristic driver’s cab. The newly founded Cab Concept Cluster project brings together a network of renowned suppliers, the Technische Universität Dresden, and VDBUM, the German association for construction, environmental, and machine technology. The project’s aim is to demonstrate to manufacturers of construction machinery, agricultural machinery, and industrial forklifts how much potential there is for efficient system integration. This concept has already notched up its first success: the Genius CAB driver’s cab won the bauma innovation award in the Design category.

Which individual components go into the Bosch driver’s cab?
The body computer is the central element in the electronic concept. It reduces the number of electrical connections, relays, and fuses. This not only saves on material but also makes circuits less complex, which in turn greatly reduces error rates. The body computer’s programming can be customized to suit each customer’s applications. In the Genius CAB, the body computer performs central control of the sensor and actuator systems via CAN (J1939), LIN, or directly.

The Bosch direct wiper drive adjusts effortlessly to the prevailing weather conditions – whether snow, showers, or hard rain. What is more, the wiper drive can be flexibly adjusted to fit different cabs.

Bosch side-view mirror replacement displays give drivers a digital look over their shoulder. Integrating the displays into the vehicle interior means there is no need for side-view mirrors. Particularly in the working environment of a construction site, reducing blind spots significantly increases workplace safety.

An ultrasonic sensor system can monitor the environment when human eyesight is not enough – when visibility is poor, for example, or even at night. These sensors give drivers unobstructed all-round vision, which further heightens operating safety. The display shows drivers any obstacles, so they can react accordingly. Measurement ranges can be defined individually for each sensor.

The central user interface in the Genius CAB is the DI4-mid display and terminal, which can be operated using buttons or via the touchscreen. With a 7-inch display, the DI4 is a universally applicable control system that is freely programmable using the Codesys V3.5 development environment.

Another interface is the 4THE5 joystick. In excavators, this controls functions such as shovel movements. At the same time, the joystick is an important interface to the DI4-mid terminal, since its push buttons can be used to activate terminal functions including the windshield wipers, side-view mirror replacement system, and cab lighting.

Contact person for press inquiries:
Florian Flaig, phone: +49 711 811-6282
More
Add to my press materials
  • April 12, 2016
  • Press releases
  • Mobility Solutions
  • Images: 4