Business/economy

India: partner country of Hannover Messe 2015 Bosch expects positive development in India Opportunities with solutions for connected production

  • Bosch forecasts further strong growth in India
  • “Make in India” initiative offers opportunities for connected industry
  • Software solutions for connected manufacturing in India
  • Bosch focuses on technologies that are “Invented for life” and tailored to local market
The Bosch Group is forecasting strong growth over the next few years for India, this year’s partner country of Hannover Messe 2015. The company expects to see positive development in the country over the medium and long term. As early as this year, India’s economy is expected to grow by six percent. “The new Indian government is systematically addressing key issues such as infrastructure, education, and reducing bureaucracy. We are confident that this will positively impact the country’s development,” said Dr. Steffen Berns, president of the Bosch Group in India. Bosch has been active in India since 1922 and continues to see a healthy business climate on the subcontinent. “Especially in the areas of mobility, infrastructure, industry, energy, security, packaging, and healthcare, there are many opportunities for our products and solutions. The field of connected production also opens up possibilities for Bosch in India,” Berns said.

Bosch uses connected production in India
The new “Make in India” business initiative, for example, aims to advance industrialization in the country and modernize production. “We believe that the use of intelligent and connected solutions in manufacturing will play an increasing role in India. Bosch is very well positioned for this,” Berns said. With regard to connected industry, Bosch is a leading global provider and exponent. The supplier of technologies and services offers a broad range of solutions such as drives, automation solutions, sensors, software, and predictive maintenance. In order to meet the standards required for connected production, Bosch is also cooperating closely with partners in Germany and abroad. One example is the company’s partnership with IT companies Tech Mahindra in India and Cisco in the United States. In conjunction with these two partners, Bosch is driving forward connectivity in industrial tools as part of the Industrial Internet Consortium.

Industry 4.0: examples from India
Bosch’s largest development center outside Germany is located in Bangalore and Coimbatore in southern India, and employs some 15,000 associates. One of the center’s areas of focus is on developing solutions for connected industry. For instance, its engineers have developed software which links all the machinery in a manufacturing facility and enables the collection and analysis of data in real time. This enables production status to be monitored and material shortages as well as machine failures to be resolved quickly.

Since 2014, the development center in Bangalore has also been focusing on big data analytics. A software model for analyzing big data collected in manufacturing was also developed there. The model performs statistical analysis on the basis of algorithms, thus enabling specific predictions to be made and changes to be detected. It can be employed in factories, for instance, to reduce throughput times, enable predictive maintenance, and optimize resource use, as well as to improve the management of capacity, inventory, and logistics. Bosch uses manufacturing data at its plants in Bangalore and Jaipur, for example, to shorten throughput times in the testing and calibration of diesel injection pumps.

Worldwide, 20 of Bosch’s more than 250 plants are already equipped with RFID (radio frequency identification) logistics solutions. These are used in Bosch’s diesel plant in Nashik, for example, where RFID radio tags monitor the workpieces’ progress through the factory by identifying the position of transport crates. The tags enable precise details to be known about the process steps each piece undergoes and when the injectors will be ready. This information can then be used as the basis for drawing up a schedule for packing, shipping, and installation.

Technologies “Invented for life” and tailored to local requirements
In emerging markets like India, Bosch focuses on locally developed solutions that are tailored to the requirements of the local market. For instance, Bosch in India has successfully developed an electronic hitch control for Indian tractor manufacturers as well as a common-rail system for small engines. One of the Bangalore development center’s recent innovations is a compact retinal camera with special software that can detect conditions such as cataracts at an early stage. Last year, Bosch also developed an affordable and robust engine management system that is specially designed for the booming Indian two-wheeler market.

A proven model for developing skills
“The well-educated workforce and ease of communication in English increase India’s attractiveness,” Berns said. Bosch has operated a training center in India for more than 50 years using the proven Bosch model of dual education. Every year, around 60 young people start an apprenticeship at the Bosch Vocational Center in Bangalore. Bosch trains more people than it actually needs in India, and in this way fulfills its social responsibility to provide vocational training for young people.

Bosch in India
Over the past ten years, Bosch has more than tripled its sales in India, generating 1.2 billion euros in 2013. The company currently employs more than 28,000 associates at eleven manufacturing and development sites. Since 2010, the Bosch Group has invested around 680 million euros in the expansion of manufacturing and research facilities in India, including some 160 million euros in the past year alone. In 2014, a new research and technology center opened in Bangalore which is focused on the development of connected technologies for the internet of things. (Remarks: 2014 Bosch India sales will be announced in May 2015)

Video material:
India
Industry 4.0 at Bosch
Virtual depiction of a supply chain
Analyzing big data in manufacturing

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Examples of connected industry Industry 4.0 in practice at Bosch Multiple ways to enhance competitiveness

  • Inventory in four hours instead of one month
  • Storage reduced by around a third using RFID transmission technology
  • Declining error rates thanks to sensors
Stuttgart – Bosch is boosting the competitiveness of its factories by applying its own Industry 4.0 solutions. At present, the Bosch Group has over 100 projects on this topic, with this number rising rapidly. A few reports from Bosch associates demonstrate what benefits these solutions offer:

Turning inventory into a walk in the park
Zhao Chunya, product planner in Suzhou, China: “Before, we had to devote a lot of time and effort each year to doing inventory. Plant 1 alone has four manufacturing areas, each with up to 2,500 machines, test benches, and measuring equipment. The process sometimes took up to a month for ABS manufacturing alone, with some of the equipment standing idle during that time. We used to print out lists and head off in search of the equipment. Sometimes we had to crawl between the machines to find the stickers with the information.
All that has changed completely. Now I’m able to do it alone in just four hours. We fitted all of the machines and equipment with RFID transponders. This allows objects to be identified without physical contact. We then built this RFID trolley with antennas on the side. I download an inventory list from the network to my laptop. Then I push the trolley through the aisles along a prescribed route. Little by little, the machines and devices are automatically identified thanks to the RFID technology. As they are, more and more lines on my spreadsheet turn green. It cuts the time needed for inventory by 97 percent, or 440 man-hours. In the future, we plan to replace the RFID transponders with connected sensors. That would mean we wouldn’t even need to do the walking part. And I could spend more time focusing on my real job. I am a product planner, after all!”

The warehouse talks to the supplier
Attila Szabó, machine accessories and spare parts coordinator in Hatvan, Hungary: “We have about 5,000 machines for the various production and testing processes at our plant, which are very different from one another. Some of them are 15 years old, while others are much newer. That’s why we need lots of different spare parts. So far we’ve equipped the majority of them with RFID transponders. As a result, we need only twelve man-days for inventory – instead of 180. I can focus more on improvement processes now. What’s more, we’ve also partly automated the ordering process thanks to this technology. A part is automatically reordered from the supplier once its quantity dips below a certain level. We used to do that by sending an e-mail, but the process took more than two and a half days. We’ve already implemented this for 14,000 of the 25,000 part types. Soon it will be all of them.”

The right person to call in an emergency
Krisztián Anda, service technician in Hatvan, Hungary: “I just got a text message asking me to come to this production line in circuit board assembly right away. The operator reported a fault using a small, portable computer right at the machine. Our new system automatically notified me immediately. In the past, the operator would have informed his or her supervisor of a problem first, then the supervisor would have called the service technician. That would sometimes take 15 minutes. And I used to get called a lot, even though I’m not an expert for this line. Thanks to the small computers and new software, we’ve cut the reaction time. Now, on average, it’s much less than five minutes – sometimes only about 30 seconds. I can submit the support ticket on site directly into the system. I don’t need paper anymore. Plus, all of us are only called out to look at machines that we’re familiar with, thus enabling fast and effective troubleshooting.”

Learning with sensors
Patrick Arnold, skilled production worker in Reutlingen, Germany: “We manufacture the power electronics for electric and hybrid vehicles on this production line. At my station, I tighten a part onto radiators. We have now equipped the Bosch Rexroth nutrunner with a sensor that measures the speed at which I put the screw in and gives me feedback. The figures are entered directly into our computer system. It additionally stores the torque and rotation angle for each screw so that we can analyze it in greater depth later. It gives you a better feel for what you’re doing and improved quality assurance.”

Storage in production reduced by nearly one third
Andreas Müller, logistics and RFID expert at Bosch: “At the Homburg plant, we produce injection nozzles for diesel engines. There, RFID radio tags monitor the workpieces’ progress through the factory by identifying the position of transport crates. This enables precise details to be known about the process steps each piece undergoes and when the injectors will be ready. That data, in turn, can be used to determine when the finished product will be packaged, shipped, and installed. Bosch has involved one of its suppliers (Variopack) and one of its customers (Opel) in this process, so that we can all jointly plan and produce better. Using this system, Bosch has been able to boost productivity by ten percent in logistics alone – and reduce storage in production by nearly one third. To ensure that the systems work to the advantage of all stakeholders, we established a common standard for exchanging data.”

Background: RFID technology
The term RFID (radio frequency identification) refers to technology that can identify objects quickly and without physical contact. RFID tags containing a code can be mounted on transport crates, spare parts, or tools, for example. A scanner uses radio waves to read the code. Depending on the type of RFID technology used, this works over a distance of anywhere from a centimeter to a meter.

Internet:
Industry 4.0 at Bosch:
http://bit.ly/1HteYWu
Bosch pools Industry 4.0 expertise in its
Connected Industry innovation cluster:
http://bit.ly/1CE9p6n
Industry 4.0 Award for assembly line at Bosch Rexroth:
http://bit.ly/1HiHbvU
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Hannover Messe 2015 Bosch’s comprehensive portfolio Selected new solutions

  • Solutions for connected industry from a single source
  • Predictive maintenance prevents unplanned downtimes
  • Intuitive user interfaces
Stuttgart – At Hannover Messe 2015 (April 13-17), Bosch will show how it is driving connected industry forward as both a leading supplier and a leading user with its innovative, tried-and-tested solutions. The technology and services provider will demonstrate how to improve manufacturing flexibility by interlinking the virtual and real worlds.
Here are a few selected examples:

Connected hydraulic power units
By setting up a wireless connection to its existing IT systems, a company can use that link to quickly and flexibly incorporate the energy-efficient hydraulic power units in Bosch Rexroth’s ABPAC series into its production environment (“plug and play”). The units also forward the data collected by the sensors to the higher-level control system. This means the overall status of the system can be displayed there, as well as on authorized smartphones and tablets. Users see the unit’s current operating status and can respond to anomalies in good time.

Process Quality Manager
The Process Quality Manager software solution by Bosch Software Innovations monitors and documents production processes in real time. Thanks to its analysis function, the Manager can help identify errors and contain causes before faults even occur. Reporting functions allow constant monitoring of the success of the measures taken.
Details: http://bit.ly/1y4FceP

Mobile production assistants: APAS family
The mobile production assistants of the APAS family – the APAS assistant, the APAS inspector, and the APAS flexpress – work hand in hand with their human “colleagues.” Usable in a variety of situations and fully connected, the assistants support the trend toward adaptable production, with fast manufacturing facilities that can be retooled semiautomatically. Flexible assistants such as these play a major role in production. The APAS assistant is the first system to be certified for direct human-machine collaboration by the German Social Accident Insurance (DGUV) association.
Details on the APAS family: http://bit.ly/1FSTCzP

OPCON suite
Bosch offers solutions for automating manufacturing facilities from one source: the OPCON suite – a system the company itself has been using successfully for more than 15 years. The suite includes software modules that help flexibly control and monitor production data, quality data, and logistics processes according to the customer’s specifications. Intuitive user interfaces support the work on the machine. Bosch Software Innovations contributed easy-to-use graphical controls to the OPCON suite. These make it possible for manufacturing specialists, even those without previous programming knowledge, to define rules; for example, to automatically recognize problems and resolve them in good time.

Bosch’s contribution to the smart factory
Bosch is also involved in the Smart Factory Demonstrator, which realizes the practical application of several core aspects of Industry 4.0. The demonstrator is an initiative launched by the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) in Kaiserslautern, Germany, and is also on display. Bosch Rexroth collaborated on the demonstrator with automation manufacturers and developed one of the modules. Bosch Rexroth is also a member of SmartFactory KL e.V., a non-profit demonstration and research association in Europe.
Details on the demonstrator: http://bit.ly/1IsIyff

Fuel cell system ready for series production
Buderus will also be represented at the trade fair, featuring its power-generating heating system with highly efficient fuel-cell technology: the Logapower FC10. This electricity and heating system has an A++ rating for space heating in accordance with the EU’s Energy Efficiency Directive. Available from early 2016, the Logapower FC10 is suitable for new and existing single-family homes and duplexes. The system supplies heat and electricity simultaneously through combined heat and power (CHP) generation. It achieves electrical efficiency of up to 45 percent and overall efficiency of up to 85 percent. For homeowners, this means they can save up to 1,300 euros on energy costs each year; what’s more, by generating their own electricity, they become less dependent on the public power grid. And at the joint fuel-cell initiative booth, Buderus will be presenting the Logapower BZH192iT, a design study that demonstrates refinements to the successfully tested fuel cell featuring a new Titanium glass look with intuitive touchscreen interface.

Bosch KWK Systeme offers the latest in energy-efficient CHP plants and ORC (organic Rankine cycle) systems and will have a presence at the joint booth for decentralized power supply. Bosch’s ORC solutions allow customers to use waste heat and generate electricity. They can be implemented anywhere with large volumes of unused waste heat.

Internet:
Industry 4.0 at Bosch:
http://bit.ly/1HteYWu
Industry 4.0 in practice at Bosch Rexroth:
http://bit.ly/W1taAO
Industry 4.0 in practice at Bosch Software Innovations:
http://bit.ly/1IJXlir

Booth details:
Motion drive and automation: hall 23, booth C19
Rexroth foundry technology: hall 5, booth D30
Industrial automation, “connected shopfloor solutions,”
APAS family: hall 17, booth C42
Bosch Software Innovations and Bosch Rexroth: joint booth on connected industry and the digital factory: hall 7, booth E04
Bosch Thermotechnology hall 27, booth E51
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Wide-ranging portfolio at Hannover Messe 2015 Bosch driving Industry 4.0 forward with innovative products Sensors, software, and services for connected industrial production

  • Two-pronged strategy: Bosch is a seasoned leading exponent and leading provider
  • New solutions make both Bosch and its customers more competitive
  • Europe needs single digital market and fast internet
  • Example of condition monitoring: software as the basis for new business models
  • Trade fair partner country India is home to largest Bosch software development center outside Germany
Stuttgart – At Hannover Messe 2015, Bosch is exhibiting a wide range of new solutions that show how manufacturing technology and competitiveness benefit from the opportunities offered by connectivity in what is known as Industry 4.0. The exhibits include networked sensors, innovative software solutions, network-compatible drives and controls, and production assistants from the APAS family. The technology and services company successfully uses the solutions on show in Hannover at its own manufacturing sites. “This broad portfolio is evidence of our expertise as a leading exponent and provider of connected manufacturing technology,” said Dr. Werner Struth, member of the Bosch board of management. He is responsible for the Bosch Production System and the Industrial Technology business sector, with its Packaging Technology and Drive and Control Technology divisions. “With this technology, we are making both ourselves and our customers more competitive, and this not only in high-wage countries such as Germany, but also worldwide.” Industry 4.0 opens up cost advantages in a number of ways, including resource conservation and higher productivity, as well as better quality.

Rapid adoption of Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation needed
But according to Struth, connected production is not solely a matter of technology: “At present, data-protection regulations vary from country to country in Europe. This is preventing European companies from being just as successful with connected solutions in their home markets and in international competition.” Struth reminded his audience that Europe is the world’s largest economic area. Bosch is confident that the Council of Ministers will reach a final decision on the EU General Data Protection Regulation before the summer recess, and that the regulation can thus be adopted before 2015 is out. “For companies to be able to exploit the EU’s huge business potential, the new General Data Protection Regulation urgently needs to be implemented before the year is out.” And because it is also crucial that companies have access to fast and reliable data exchange, Struth made an urgent plea for the rapid expansion of high-speed internet connections: “We could be world beaters in Industry 4.0, but slow internet connections are holding us back. These days, a reliable internet connection is just as important as supplies of water and electricity and a traffic infrastructure.”

“Focusing on our customers’ needs”
“At Bosch, connected manufacturing is already reality. The machinery, software, and concepts needed for it, are in everyday use at our manufacturing sites worldwide,” Struth said. “Connectivity offers the German mechanical engineering industry many opportunities to maintain the strong position it holds today. In particular, new business models tailored to customers’ needs will unleash the full potential of connected industry.” At Hannover Messe, Bosch is showing the technical basis for such new business models.

Online diagnosis for predictive maintenance
These include the service package known as ODiN, which stands for online diagnostics network. Using a cloud-based software platform, Bosch Rexroth can continuously record and analyze the operating status of users’ hydraulic systems. Wear and tear can be identified at an early stage. As part of a maintenance agreement, Rexroth then recommends any necessary work, which it then performs. This reduces maintenance costs. Moreover, such predictive maintenance also considerably reduces the risk of breakdown. Especially when the machinery involved is complex – at steel works, for example, or in mining operations – this can save the huge costs associated with any unscheduled downtimes. The same applies to packaging machinery for foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals, which has to be capable of extremely short cycle times and round the clock operation.

Data security and data protection
Werner Struth also pointed out that “keeping data secure is a core competence in all areas of connected production.” He stressed how important data protection and data security are for the widespread acceptance of Industry 4.0 solutions: “We will tell our customers what data we want to use for what purpose, and we will ask them for their express consent.” One central aspect here is authorized access to manufacturing lines. To ensure this, Bosch Software Innovations has come up with a new software solution. Called Remote Service Manager, it ensures that only authorized service technicians can log onto a machine remotely in order to perform a detailed status check. These checks allow errors to be detected quickly, and in many cases promptly remedied as well. In many cases, there is no longer any need for long and expensive journeys to the customer. One of the things Bosch is demonstrating at the trade fair is how the APAS production assistant can be remotely serviced in this way. Moreover, the Remote Service Manager provides a secure interface for uploading new software to machinery.

Connected sensors give a clear picture of the transportation process
Also at the trade fair, which is the world’s largest and runs from April 13 to 17, 2015, Bosch Connected Devices and Solutions will be demonstrating connected sensors that can precisely register every movement a small crate makes during transport. An app displays movement and position on a screen. Any critical events, such as the unscheduled opening of the crate, is detected by a photosensor. The benefit for the user is a better overview of the entire transportation process.

Efficient manufacture of small batches
One of the distinguishing features of Industry 4.0 is that it allows small batches to be manufactured efficiently. These may be spare parts for superannuated machinery and cars, or for prototypes of new products. The Bosch Rexroth foundry uses 3D printers to speed up the casting process. The printers can make cores and molds to specification. At the Hannover trade fair, the foundry will be demonstrating how this reduces the delivery times and the cost of customized castings. Customers send the foundry the design data of the part they want made. At the foundry, 3D printers make the sand core or the complex molds. This obviates the need for the complex development and manufacture of individual molding tools. Not only does this reduce the unit costs of prototypes and small-series products, it also shortens the time that elapses between receipt of data and casting.

About Industry 4.0
In Industry 4.0, the pieces being processed feature barcodes, RFID chips, and web-enabled sensors. The partially or even fully automatic capture and transmission of data gives rise to a virtual map of physical reality, i.e. of the pieces, machines, and factories. A network of software programs, mechanical parts, and electronic parts communicates globally over the internet. This allows constant coordination and optimization, also among locations and across company boundaries. Data that were previously only used for a short while can now be used as a source of information, and in the end of new knowledge and benefits. It is in business models, however, that the real breakthrough is expected to be seen. New operator models are one example: it is conceivable that manufacturing machinery will stay in the ownership of the companies that make them. Instead of selling them, these companies will offer their customers a number of processed units or operating hours.

About Bosch in India
In 2015, India is the partner country of Hannover Messe. Bosch has been present in India since 1922. “In India as well, connected manufacturing opens up many new opportunities for us,” Struth said. In the years ahead, Bosch expects to see a re-emergence of stronger growth stimuli there. There are many opportunities for Bosch in the country, especially in the areas of mobility, infrastructure, energy, security, packaging technology, and healthcare. Government plans to boost industrialization make India attractive for mechanical engineering companies as well. Over the past ten years, the company has more than tripled its sales in India to approximately 1.2 billion euros. The company currently employs more than 28,000 associates in India, at eleven manufacturing sites and seven engineering locations. Of this total, more than 15,000 work at the company’s largest software engineering center outside Germany, which is located in Bangalore and Coimbatore. Since 2010, the Bosch Group has invested around 680 million euros in the expansion of manufacturing and research facilities in India, of which some 160 million were invested last year alone.

Where to find the booths:
Motion drive and automation: hall 23, booth C19
Rexroth molding and casting: hall 5, booth D30
Industrial automation, “connected shop-floor solutions,”
APAS family: hall 17, booth C42
Connected industry and digital factory, joint booth of Bosch Software Innovations and Bosch Rexroth: hall 7, booth E04
Thermotechnology: hall 27, booth E51

Internet:
Bosch Rexroth trade fair presence:
http://bit.ly/1CLPYqU
Bosch Software Innovations trade fair presence:
http://bit.ly/1CfFP1z
APAS family:
http://www.bosch-apas.com
Thermotechnology:
http://bit.ly/1IsBuzr
Outline of Industry 4.0 at Bosch
http://bit.ly/1HteYWu
Bosch pools its Industry 4.0 competencies in the
“connected industry” cluster:
http://bit.ly/1CE9p6n
Industry 4.0 Award for assembly line at Bosch Rexroth:
http://bit.ly/1HiHbvU
Foundry uses 3D printers to make molds:
http://bit.ly/1CM9jbd
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  • April 10, 2015
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