Business/economy

Wide range of career opportunities Bosch plans to recruit some 12,000 new associates Exciting challenges for software developers

  • New hires: in growth regions and Europe
  • Growing number of jobs in software-related areas
  • From start-up to large-scale organization: Bosch offers a wide range of working environments
  • Key competence for the future: systems and software engineering
Stuttgart – In 2015, Bosch plans to recruit 12,000 trained graduates worldwide. In addition to a number of prospects for mechanical and electrical engineers, the chances for graduates with an IT background are especially favorable. “We are increasing the number associates hired for software design and development. As connectivity expands in every business sector, from Mobility Solutions to Industrial Technology, the importance of software does too,” says Christoph Kübel, member of the board of management and director of industrial relations at Robert Bosch GmbH. The number of associates needed for software design and development will continue to rise in the future. The countries with the greatest need for recruiting trained graduates are India, which is planning some 3,200 new hires; China, which is planning 2,600 new hires; and Germany, whose plans include 1,200 new hires. Three out of every four new associates will be in the field of engineering. The prospects are also favorable for people just starting their professional careers. Almost every third position is open to potential associates with no previous professional experience.

Growing demand for software developers
Bosch is already busy connecting entire cities and bringing cars online, creating access to heating control systems via an app, and automatically integrating its suppliers into the supply chain. It has also connected electric stoves and other household appliances to the internet. As a result, the amount of software and its complexity – in terms of product development and manufacturing as well as for the products and systems themselves – is growing. Consider emergency braking systems for vehicles, for example. Using a radar or video sensor, the emergency braking function is able to detect whether there is an obstacle in the lane ahead. The system’s software evaluates the information in just fractions of a second and then triggers full emergency braking, if necessary.

Bosch is prepared for these demands facing product development and manufacturing. In cooperation with universities in the United States, associates in Palo Alto, California, are developing software for applications including automated driving. The software for the Indego Connect robotic lawnmower was also developed there. Bosch Software Innovations, the Bosch Group’s software and systems unit, designs, develops, and operates software and systems solutions for the internet of things. Robert Bosch Engineering and Business Solutions in India also employs a large number of software specialists. The specialists there, for example, have adapted the software algorithms of a video camera used in quality control in such a way that the camera can perform examinations of the human retina. This solution makes it possible to detect eye diseases more quickly and cost-effectively than before.

Wide range of career opportunities – room for creativity
Start-up fan or corporate enthusiast? They do not have to be at odds with each other because Bosch offers both. The company supports proprietary start-ups as a means of quickly translating research findings into new business fields. Bosch also taps entirely new business fields with small, powerful units. One example of this is Bosch eBike Systems, which has evolved from a start-up into a global player and the European market leader in just five years. Bosch not only facilitates the shift between corporate and start-up structures, but also the move between specialist, project, or leadership career paths.

In addition to a wide range of career opportunities and working environments, Bosch attaches great importance to ensuring room for creativity. As a result, many associates have the option to spend some of their working time on other software projects within the Bosch Group as part of an open-source approach. Associates are able to suggest their own ideas, such as for new products on the internet of things, on Bosch’s internal social business platform known as Bosch Connect. One project that grew out of this aims to make the search for parking spots in big cities easier.

Equal opportunities for women
By 2020, Bosch wants to increase the share of women in leadership positions to 20 percent worldwide. That figure for the company as a whole has already reached more than twelve percent, with certain countries, such as China, having already exceeded the target. “We want more female executives because mixed leadership teams are more successful,” Kübel says. For this reason, Bosch is pursuing a policy of diversity management worldwide, encouraging respect for heterogeneity and non-standard career paths. To provide women with assistance and support on their career paths, Bosch offers special mentoring programs, networks, seminars, and training courses. In total, Bosch invests some 190 million euros each year in the further training and development of associates.

Family-friendly employer
To help reconcile the demands of associates’ professional and private lives, Bosch offers some 100 working-time models – from working from home to part-time employment and job sharing. The technology and service company believes this is one key to its innovative strength, and its guidelines for a flexible and family-friendly working culture apply worldwide and contribute to the satisfaction, productivity, and creativity of associates. In addition to family and child care options, the recognition of family time as a career stepping stone also promotes a family-friendly working culture at Bosch.

For more information online:
Job vacancies: http://bit.ly/bosch_vacancies_worldwide
Diversity at Bosch: http://bit.ly/bosch_diversity_worldwide
Work-life balance at Bosch: http://bit.ly/bosch_work_life_balance_en

Videos:
Automated driving – driving strategy
http://bit.ly/bosch_automated_driving_driving_strategy_en

Shaping change – mobility solutions by Bosch
http://bit.ly/bosch_shaping_change_mobility_solutions_en

Connected industry at a glance
http://bit.ly/bosch_connected_industry_overview

Software engineering at Bosch - making of photo shoot
http://videoportal.bosch-presse.de/en/clip/_/-/-/Software-Entwickler-bei-Bosch-making-of-Fotoshooting
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  • March 24, 2015
  • Press releases
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“Networked production will become the new normal” Bosch pools Industry 4.0 expertise in the “Connected Industry” innovation cluster Customers benefit from innovative solutions

  • Interdisciplinary cooperation across the board
  • Flexible multi-product lines being used in production
  • Bosch is both a lead supplier and lead user
  • Securing competitiveness in Germany, a high-cost location
Stuttgart – Bosch has concentrated its activities in the field of networked production manufacturing in a new innovation cluster. “We are pooling our Industry 4.0 expertise in the Connected Industry innovation cluster. This will make us large enough to provide our customers and the 15 Bosch divisions with the flexible and agile support they need to implement Industry 4.0,” said Dr. Werner Struth, member of the Bosch board of management. “The topic of Industry 4.0 is strategically important because it offers Germany a historical opportunity to enhance its competiveness as an industrial location.” In the area of networked production, Bosch is both lead supplier and lead user.

New business ideas for a connected world
Based on the ongoing “Industry 4.0@Bosch” project, the innovation cluster currently counts around 100 associates. By further combining its manufacturing expertise with its sensor and software know-how, Bosch expects to see additional progress in the development of new business models. To this end, a network of experts will be created at the global provider of technology and services. Specialist groups have already been established at many of the company’s locations, and more than 100 pilot projects are underway. By the end of 2015, the innovation cluster will count some 200 associates. In cross-sectoral innovation clusters such as this one, Bosch develops new business ideas for a connected world. The company has established other clusters in the areas of connected building, connected mobility, and connected energy.

Pursuing a dual strategy: lead provider and lead user
Bosch offers hardware and software for networked production. As a manufacturer, the company is also a user of Industry 4.0 technology. The global provider of technology and services has extensive expertise in the realm of production, which it has acquired through the manufacture of millions of automotive components, for instance, or in the production of individual complex packaging machinery. This expertise is complemented by the software know-how of Bosch Software Innovations, the company’s own software and systems provider. In addition to this, Bosch has long mastered the software embedded in things. All of this means that it is better prepared for networked production than almost any other company.

APAS: Cooperation without protective barriers
Dr. Stefan Aßmann is the head of the new innovation cluster. The Bosch engineer previously held positions as site manager in Germany and abroad, and was also head of engineering for special machinery at Bosch. Under his leadership, many Industry 4.0 solutions have been industrialized, among them the APAS automatic production assistant. This robotic arm is the first and thus far only assistance system in production that cooperates with people without a protective barrier. Aßmann reports directly to the Bosch board member Dr. Werner Struth, who is in charge of production coordination and thus also oversees the topic of Industry 4.0.

Major improvements to productivity
As a result of networked production processes, Aßmann expects productivity to increase by up to 30 percent. “With Industry 4.0, we can also remain competitive in Germany in spite of it being a high-cost location. Networked production is set to become the new normal. This is clear at this year’s CeBIT, we will see it again at the Hannover Messe, and it will certainly continue to be a hot topic in the years to come.”

Focus on users
“We are developing new solutions for networked production and are putting them into practice at our locations in Germany and abroad,” said Aßmann. “Moreover, we offer many of the solutions we’ve developed to external customers. We also provide a broad range of software as well as drive and control technologies for industrial automation. Customers can use these solutions efficiently for their own projects. With this portfolio, we have demonstrated our expertise as lead provider and lead user in connected industry.” And yet, according to Aßmann, technical innovation is not the only consideration. “In order for Industry 4.0 to be successful, connected solutions must focus more on users and their requirements than on the technology or product.”

International cooperation
In order to meet the standards required for networked production, Bosch is also cooperating closely with other partners in Germany and abroad. One example is the company’s collaborative project with Tech Mahindra and Cisco. Together with these two partners, Bosch is pushing the networking of industrial tools forward as part of the Industrial Internet Consortium. The first outcome of their collaboration is the ability to determine the position of the Bosch Nexo cordless nutrunner on the shop floor with extreme precision. This positioning information is used to automatically select the correct torque for the respective task, making it possible to tighten safety-relevant bolts with exactly the required torque, for example. It is also possible to automatically document these settings to ensure and test product quality. Potential applications include the maintenance and construction of engines and aircraft.

One line, two hundred modules
In Homburg, Bosch already has a multiproduct line that can produce two hundred different hydraulic modules up to batch size 1 very flexibly. This is because the line’s nine stations are connected to one another in a smart network. Thanks to an RFID chip on the workpiece, the stations recognize how a product should be assembled and which work steps are required. This also enables the efficient production of small quantities. This is necessary because some modules are needed more frequently than others. The multiproduct line is capable of producing several different modules simultaneously. The corresponding work plans are automatically retrieved and displayed as photos or films on monitors – they are even tailored to the associate’s level of education and native language. Associates thus receive the best possible support with their work. Out of 2,000 different components that are automatically made available when they are needed, they assemble 200 different variants of hydraulic modules. These modules control the work and traction hydraulics in trucks or tractors, for instance to tip loading beds or lift a plow. At the end of December 2014, this multiproduct line won the “Industry 4.0” award, which was presented by the specialist magazine Produktion in cooperation with ROI Management Consulting AG. The award honored the key elements of Industry 4.0 that Bosch has already put into practice: decentralized intelligence, fast connectivity, context integration in real time, and the autonomous performance of tasks.

Industry 4.0: background
The work pieces of Industry 4.0 are intelligent. They are equipped either with barcodes, RFID chips, or internet-enabled sensors. Thanks to partially or fully automated information gathering and transmission, a virtual copy of the physical world can be created. The network of software programs, mechanical parts, and electronic parts communicates around the world via the internet. This makes constant coordination and improvements between locations or even beyond the walls of the company possible. But business models are expected to see the most dramatic change, for instance in the area of new operator models. In the future, manufacturers of production machinery may retain ownership of their machines. Rather than selling them, they may offer their customers specific produced quantities or operating hours. The potential for the development of new and profitable business models is practically unlimited.

Interactive infographic about Industry 4.0:
View: http://bit.ly/1CvVSxN
Download: http://bit.ly/1xy76Ky
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  • March 20, 2015
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17th Technical Congress of the VDA Bosch CEO Denner: “Connectivity makes cars more efficient”

  • Denner: “A connected car drives more proactively than any person”
  • Connectivity increases the suitability of electrified vehicles for everyday use
  • By 2025, 15 percent of new vehicles worldwide will be electrified
Stuttgart – Cars still have their best days ahead of them. Connecting vehicles to the internet makes them safer, more fun to drive, and reduces fuel consumption. “Connectivity makes cars more efficient,” said Dr. Volkmar Denner, chairman of the Bosch board of management, at the 17th Technical Congress of the German Association of the Automotive Industry (VDA) in Filderstadt, Germany. As an example of this, Denner pointed to the connected electronic horizon. In the future, this Bosch technology will provide real-time information about mobile construction zones, traffic jams, and accidents. On this basis, further improvements to existing functions such as start-stop coasting will be possible. At the same time, it will enable a predictive operating strategy for plug-in hybrids. Technologies such as this reduce CO2 emissions by up to ten percent or more. “These efficiency-enhancing measures should be recognized as ‘eco-innovations’ by the EU,” Denner said.

“A connected car drives more proactively than any person”
The reductions to consumption brought by start-stop coasting and an optimum operating strategy are most noticeable in real traffic conditions. In the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), however, they have no effect. “A connected car drives more proactively than any person,” Denner said. Using up-to-date maps, cars can precisely calculate their remaining range in addition to the most efficient route. At the same time, intelligent connectivity increases the suitability of electrified vehicles for everyday use. “In only ten years, more than 15 percent of new vehicles worldwide will be electrified,” Denner said. Of these, more than 13 million new vehicles will be able to run on electricity alone, at least in urban traffic. To further increase the electric range of hybrids and electric cars, Bosch is working on improving electronic battery management. This can increase the electric range of a car by up to an additional 10 percent and give electromobility a further boost.

Eco-innovations can help meet EU fleet targets
Technically-sophisticated components make vehicles more economical and efficient, allowing them to meet the strict CO2 targets set by the European Commission. European regulations stipulate that in 2021, new vehicles will be allowed to emit an average of only 95 grams of CO2 per kilometer. This corresponds to just over four liters of fuel consumed per hundred kilometers. In 2013, new vehicles emitted an average of 132.9 grams of CO2 per kilometer. The EU recognizes especially environmentally-friendly technologies as “eco-innovations.” Automakers can use these as CO2 credits to reduce their fleet consumption levels. The maximum possible credit is 7 grams per kilometer.
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  • March 19, 2015
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