Mobility Solutions

Vehicle dynamics control now also for motorcycles Bosch stability control makes cornering safer

  • Optimum braking and accelerating, even in bends
  • Reduced risk within the laws of physics
  • Motorcycle stability control can further improve road safety
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  • November 12, 2012
  • Mobility Solutions
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press release

Bosch has developed a stability control system for high-performance motorcycles, which goes into series production in 2013. Motorcycle stability control (MSC) is a great leap forward in motorcycle safety. It works by supporting the biker in all situations, during both braking and accelerating, and while riding straight as well as while cornering. The motorcycle’s handling – and thus all the pleasure of riding – remains unchanged. “24 percent of all motorcycle accidents happen in bends,” says Gerhard Steiger, president of the Bosch Chassis Systems Control division. “The Bosch MSC motorcycle stability control can help further reduce the number of accidents.” In 2009, more than 5,000 motorcyclists died in road accidents in Europe alone. Studies show that ABS on its own can prevent around one-quarter of all motorcycle accidents that lead to injury or death. Stability control will increase this number even further.

Improved safety – also in bends
The technical basis of the MSC is the ABS enhanced system, which Bosch engineers in the Japanese center of competence for powered two-wheeler safety have now expanded to include an extensive array of sensors and sophisticated software. This system offers motorcycle manufacturers and their demanding customers a whole range of safety functions:
  • The lean and pitch angle-dependent ABS control improves riding stability in all riding situations as well as braking effectiveness.
  • The traction control regulates the maximum engine torque so that even on variable or slippery road surfaces, the driving force is efficiently transferred to the road and the drive wheel does not lose its grip.
  • When braking heavily in curves, the MSC reduces the motorcycle’s tendency to return to an upright position. This involuntary righting of the machine leads to a larger cornering radius, which often results in the motorcycle leaving its lane. In these situations, the eCBS electronic combined brake system creates the best possible distribution of brake force between the wheels, and thus stabilizes the bike during cornering.
  • The MSC also reduces the risk of “lowsiders”. These are accidents in which the motorcycle capsizes during cornering and the wheels slide out toward the outside of the bend. They occur when too much brake force is applied during cornering and the wheels are not able to transfer sufficient side force onto the road. MSC counteracts this by detecting the risk of a lowsider and limiting the maximum brake force. The eCBS function distributes this maximum available brake force between the wheels, ensuring the best possible brake performance under cornering conditions.
  • The eCBS function ensures optimum distribution of brake force at all times – even when the biker mistakenly uses only one of the two brakes, or brakes with too much force.
  • The wheelie-mitigation controls the engine torque, preventing the front wheel from lifting uncontrollably and at the same time ensuring maximum acceleration.
  • The rear-wheel lift-up mitigation function keeps the rear wheel on the road by reducing the maximum brake force on the front wheel when riding on surfaces with high friction coefficients. Riding stability is maintained, taking pitch rate and longitudinal acceleration into account.
Electronic systems identify the limits of driving dynamics
The motorcycle stability control uses an extensive array of sensors to register the driving dynamics of the machine. Wheel sensors measure the rotational speed of the front and rear wheels, and an inertia sensor module computes the vehicle's lean and pitch angles more than 100 times per second. By analyzing the sensor data, the difference in speed between front and rear wheels, as well as other motorcycle-specific parameters such as tire size, tire shape, and sensor location, the ABS control unit calculates the physical limits of brake force on the basis of lean angle.

If the motorcycle stability control recognizes that a wheel is starting to lock, the ABS control unit activates the pressure modulator in the hydraulic brake circuit. This lowers the brake pressure and builds it up again within a fraction of a second, with the result that exactly as much brake pressure is applied as is necessary to keep each wheel from locking.

For motorcyclists, the Bosch MSC can be a lifesaver. However, just like ABS, it cannot suspend the laws of physics. In particular, extreme misjudgment of the riding situation and major errors on the part of the biker can still lead to an accident. Nonetheless, the system supports bikers in borderline situations, helping them get more out of their motorcycles, while keeping them much safer at the same time.

Mobility Solutions is the largest Bosch Group business sector. In 2013, its sales came to 30.6 billion euros, or 66 percent of total group sales. This makes the Bosch Group one of the leading automotive suppliers (NB: Due to a change in accounting policies, the 2013 figures can only be compared to a limited extent with the 2012 figures). Mobility Solutions largely operates in the following areas: injection technology for internal-combustion engines, alternative powertrain concepts, efficient and networked powertrain peripherals, systems for active and passive driving safety, assistance and comfort functions, technology for user-friendly infotainment as well as car-to-car and Car2X communication, and concepts, technology, and service for the automotive aftermarket. Bosch has been responsible for important automotive innovations, such as electronic engine management, the ESP anti-skid system, and common-rail diesel technology.

The Bosch Group is a leading global supplier of technology and services. In 2013, its roughly 281,000 associates generated sales of 46.1 billion euros. (NB: Due to a change in accounting policies, the 2013 figures can only be compared to a limited extent with the 2012 figures). Its operations are divided into four business sectors: Automotive Technology, Industrial Technology, Consumer Goods, and Energy and Building Technology. The Bosch Group comprises Robert Bosch GmbH and its roughly 360 subsidiaries and regional companies in some 50 countries. If its sales and service partners are included, then Bosch is represented in roughly 150 countries. This worldwide development, manufacturing, and sales network is the foundation for further growth. In 2013, the Bosch Group invested some 4.5 billion euros in research and development and applied for some 5,000 patents. This is an average of 20 patents per day. The Bosch Group’s products and services are designed to fascinate, and to improve the quality of life by providing solutions which are both innovative and beneficial. In this way, the company offers technology worldwide that is “Invented for life.”

Further information is available online at www.bosch.com and www.bosch-press.com, http://twitter.com/BoschPresse.

PI7924 - November 12, 2012

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